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Engineering Everywhere

Afterschool educators who want to offer STEM activities for middle schoolers in the coming school year have some fun new choices. Engineering is Elementary (EiE), the award-winning STEM curriculum project based at the Museum of Science, Boston, has released two new units for the Engineering Everywhere (EE) curriculum. This brings the total number of EE units available for afterschool and camp programs that serve youth in grades 6 through 8 to eight.

The EIE Curriculum

The award-winning curriculum Engineering is Elementary (EiE) offers educators a comprehensive set of “alignment guides”—

Engineering is Elementary

For the second year in a row, the Museum of Science, Boston and the philanthropy SheGives Boston are collaborating to bring fun, educational STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) activities to Massachusetts afterschool programs. A $25,000 award from SheGives to the Museum will support scholarships for 40 to 60 programs across the state in implementing the innovative Engineering Adventures (EA) curriculum.

Engineering Adventures

It’s easier than ever to add Engineering Adventures, the Engineering is Elementary (EiE) out-of-school time curriculum for grades 3–5, to your afterschool program. Convenient and cost-effective Materials Kits are now available for all seven Engineering Adventures (EA) units. Each kit includes enough supplies for up 24 kids.

The EIE Curriculum

Thanks to support from the information technology company Oracle, 20 Massachusetts elementary teachers will implement the award-winning STEM curriculum Engineering is Elementary® (EiE®) in their classrooms.

The EIE Curriculum

For the fourth year in a row, the EiE curriculum has been selected for the Iowa STEM Scale-Up. The statewide initiative was launched in 2012 by the Iowa Governor's STEM Advisory Council to promote student interest and achievement in STEM by improving educator access to exemplary STEM curricula.

Engineering is Elementary

In the last few years, the idea of offering engineering instruction to precollege (grades K–12)  students has gone from a radical innovation to a mainstream concept. Organizations such as the National Science Teachers Association have started looking to the next frontier, making preschool engineering a priority. The question is how to implement this kind of instruction, given that engineering curricula for very young children are rare enough to be almost non-existent.

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